Loading Events

« All Events

  • This event has passed.

Crossroads’ The Art of Period Dress Part 2

November 17 at 10:00 am - 4:00 pm

|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every day that begins at 10:00am, repeating until November 18, 2017

$30

Crossroads is excited to once again partner with the Hunterdon County Cultural and Heritage Commission to bring you our 2017 Fall Heritage Partner Professional Development Conference, “The Art of Period Dress Part 2,” on Friday, November 17 and Saturday, November 18 at 10am at the Prallsville Mills in Stockton, NJ!

The second in this popular series, this conference will feature two completely different and distinct days of programming featuring presenters that are masters in their craft. Our morning presentations will feature: Rebecca Fifield on women’s dress of the lower sorts, and Andrew Kirk on hat types and styles.

The afternoon hands-on workshops include several to help participants sew items of period clothing, and will be hosted by Eliza West, Andrew Kirk, Carrie Fellows, Kirsten Hammerstrom, David Niescior and Asher Lurie with assistance from Kim Boice and Lauren Skorka. The topics covered in the afternoon workshops include bonnets, fabric 101, hair and caps, hats, market wallets, aprons, and getting comfortable with getting dressed 18th century style for men and women.

Our presenters this fall include:

Rebecca Fifield, Head of Collection Management for the Special Collections at The New York Public Library

Rebecca Fifield is Head of Collection Management for the Special Collections at The New York Public Library. Becky started her museum career at age 13, interpreting Sarah Wilcox, a cholera orphan living at Fort Howard in Green Bay, Wisconsin in 1836. During this experience, she developed an intense interest in historic dress, material culture, living history interpretation, and collection management. Becky earned an M.A. in Museum Studies from The George Washington University in 1999, where she received a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship to study collections care administration. She is a veteran of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Historical Society of Carroll County, Westminster, MD, before joining the New York Public Library in 2016. Her research focuses on the study of indentured and enslaved female labor and their dress as studied through runaway advertisements 1750-90, for which she was awarded a Winterthur Museum fellowship in Summer 2013. She has written several articles on this topic, including for the Winterthur Museum and Library, Readex, and Pasold Research Fund’s journal Textile History, and has presented on this topic for Colonial Williamsburg, the American Antiquarian Society, the Costume Society of America, and other organizations.

Andrew Kirk, Hatter, Hatter and Artificer for HM 17th Regiment of Foot in America

Andrew has been involved with American Revolutionary War living history since the age of 13. Taking an interest in material culture of the British Army has led to creating reproductions of artifacts for TV, Film and Museum Projects. Trained as a fine artist and educator at Maryland Institute College of Art and has been a secondary art teacher in Maryland for 7 years.

Eliza West, Lois F. McNeil Fellow in the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture

Eliza West is a Lois F. McNeil Fellow in the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture. She worked previously as the head of Costume at the up-state New York living history museum Fort Ticonderoga, and has been making and teaching about eighteenth-century clothing for several years.

Kirsten Hammerstrom, Curator and Material Culture Specialist

A curator and material culture specialist for nearly three decades, Kirsten Hammerstrom brings an artist’s perspective to the world of history. Her research interests include women’s colonial and early Federal clothing and accessories. She lives and works in Alexandria, VA, but you can find her online as KittyCalash.com.

Carrie Fellows, Executive Director, Hunterdon County Cultural and Heritage Commission

Carrie is the Executive Director of the Hunterdon County (NJ) Cultural & Heritage Commission. She has served on the Board of Directors for several nonprofit organizations, including the Association for Living History, Farm and Agricultural Museums (ALHFAM). Fellows has presented programs on household tasks – from laundry and foodways to daubing and whitewashing a cabin’s interior – as well as lectured on women’s roles in 18th century civilian and military life, site costuming, integrating reenactors into special event programming, and grant writing.

Asher Lurie, Senior Historical Interpreter

Asher is a senior historical interpreter at the Old Barracks Museum, in Trenton New Jersey. A graduate of Rutgers University, his area of study is the last two quarters of the 18th century, in particular English North America. Asher in the past has spoken on the subjects of the British Army during the American Revolution and the History of the Trenton Barracks.

David Niescior, Senior Historical Interpreter

Dave, is a senior historical interpreter at the Old Barracks Museum in Trenton, New Jersey. He holds a M.A. in American history from Rutgers-Camden and was the winner of the 2016 American History Award for graduate study from the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America. A skilled tailor, Dave is well versed in the art of period dress.


Each day will include a morning presentation, followed by lunch (which will be provided), and then afternoon workshops. Please choose two workshops from the selection of four topics offered each day that you attend.

The schedule is below. You can attend one of the days or both- the choice is up to you!

There is already a lot of “buzz” about this event, so don’t wait – space is limited, and we expect a sold-out house. Registration is $30 and includes lunch.

Friday, November 17, 2017- Registration Required

Keynote Speaker for Morning Presentation-

Rebecca Fifield, Head of Collection Management for the Special Collections at The New York Public Library

Presentation- “Runaway! Recapturing Information about Working Women’s Dress through Runaway Advertisement Analysis, 1750-90″- Focus will be on women’s dress of the lower sorts

Indentured and enslaved women in the American colonies provided domestic, agricultural, and commercial labor, but left behind little documentary evidence of their lives. For those women who dared to abscond from service, information about their physical appearance was listed in newspaper runaway advertisements to help identify, capture, and return the eloped woman. For living history practitioners, historic site educators, and costume historians, runaway advertisements provide one of the strongest sources of information about working women’s clothing, in the absence of paintings and first hand accounts. This project focuses on understanding what clothing details in runaway advertisements was typical, and what was not. The speaker has assembled a database of approximately 1000 female runaway advertisements, including references for 6000 garments, using this data to analyze frequency of different types of garments, textiles, color, and jewelry reported in the runaway advertisements. The discussion will include explanation about types of unfree labor, the use of printed textiles, the supply of garments to working women by masters, and other topics.

Afternoon Workshops and Presenters- (*When registering pick two. Some workshops include an additional fee to cover materials.)

Workshop- Put a Lid on It: 18th Century Bonnets- presented by Kirsten Hammerstrom, Curator and Material Culture Specialist

Put a Lid on It: 18th Century Bonnets- After an overview of mid-to-late 18th century bonnet styles and shapes, participants will work on their own bonnet. A selection of several pre-cut brim shapes will be available, along with pre-cut pieces in the traditional black silk taffeta. After getting started, participants will have instructions for finishing the bonnet at home.

Workshop- Understanding Fabric- presented by Eliza West, Lois F. McNeil Fellow in the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture

Understanding Fabric- This workshop will teach participants about the basics needed to understand and evaluate textiles for use in period clothing. We will learn how to identify different types of fiber, as well as different weaves of cloth, and explore colors and patterns with an eye for those which are suitable for period clothing. We will handle and discuss a wide variety of fabrics, and participants will gain an understanding of their various benefits or shortcomings.

Workshop- Hair Hacks & Flattering Caps for Living History Impressions 1775-1782- presented by Carrie Fellows, Executive Director, Hunterdon County Cultural and Heritage Commission

Hair Hacks & Flattering Caps for Living History Impressions 1775-1782- A cap may flatter (or make frightful) the person who wears it – and subtle tricks underneath one’s cap may be employed to hide modern hairstyles and make them appear more like those of the 1770s. Learn to transform your contemporary hairstyle into one that mimics those of the period and looks right with a cap. Participants should bring their own caps and hair accessories (hairpins, bobby pins, barrettes, clips, combs, elastics, Alice bands, scrunchies, hairpieces, etc.), styling gel/spray, a brush and comb, and a dressing mirror that can be propped up on a table. Those with very short hair are encouraged to also bring a selection of scarves for headwraps. A variety of caps will be available for a try-on session to help participants find the most flattering and historically accurate style for their impression.

Workshop- Getting Comfortable with Getting Dressed for Men- presented by David Niescior, Senior Historical Interpreter and Asher Lurie, Senior Historical Interpreter

Walk through the process of getting dressed in eighteenth-century men’s clothes with David Niescior and Asher Lurie. In this workshop participants will get tips and tricks on how to wear period clothing comfortably and accurately. David and Asher will explore getting in and out of a few variations on “standard” eighteenth-century military uniforms and middle and lower class men’s clothing. There will be ample opportunity to ask questions and explore the ins and outs of different garments.

Saturday, November 18, 2017- Registration Required

Keynote Speaker for Morning Presentation- 

Andrew Kirk, Hatter and Artificer for HM 17th Regiment of Foot in America

Presentation- “‘I Put a Hat Upon My Head’: Hat styles during the American Revolution” (quote by Samuel Johnson)- Focus will be on hat types and styles

Afternoon Workshops and Presenters- (*When registering pick two. Some workshops include an additional fee to cover materials.)

Workshop- “What’s in Your Market Wallet” presented by David Niescior, Senior Historical Interpreter and Asher Lurie, Senior Historical Interpreter

Participants will learn how to make their own market wallets – a useful and accurate way to carry one’s period items (and disguise modern ones)

Workshop- Cover Up: Fine Plain Sewing (Aprons) presented by Kirsten Hammerstrom, Curator and Material Culture Specialist

Cover Up: Fine Plain Sewing- Aprons are an essential part of every 18th century woman’s ensemble, and in this workshop, you’ll learn fine sewing skills as you make a historically accurate linen apron. Hem stitch, rabattre sous la main, and stroke gathers will all be covered in this workshop, giving you the skills needed to expand your wardrobe. Pre-cut linen apron kits will provide the materials you need to get started right away, along with instructions for completing the apron at home.

Workshop- Hat Tricks presented by Andrew Kirk, Hatter, Hatter and Artificer for HM 17th Regiment of Foot in America

Hat tweaks, tricks and how to make your own.

Workshop- Getting Comfortable with Getting Dressed for Women presented by Eliza West, Lois F. McNeil Fellow in the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture

Getting Comfortable with Getting Dressed- Walk through the process of getting dressed in eighteenth-century women’s clothes with Eliza West. In this workshop participants will get tips and tricks on how to wear period clothing comfortably and accurately. Eliza will explore getting in and out of a few variations on “standard” eighteenth-century middle and lower class women’s clothing. There will be ample opportunity to ask questions and explore the ins and outs of different garments.


 **Space is limited for this conference- 60 seats available per day

Date:
Friday, November 17, 2017

Saturday, November 18, 2017

Time: 10:00am- 4:00pm

Location:
Prallsville Mills

33 Risler Street

Stockton, NJ 08859

One Day Registration- $30

*The following workshops are hands-on and will include a ready-made kit. These workshops will have an upcharge of $20.

 “Cover Up: Fine Plain Sewing (Aprons)”

“Put a Lid on It: 18th Century Bonnets”

“What’s in Your Market Wallet”

Details

Date:
November 17
Time:
10:00 am - 4:00 pm
Cost:
$30
Event Category:

Venue

Prallsville Mills
33 Risler Street
Stockton, NJ 08859
+ Google Map
WP-Backgrounds by InoPlugs Web Design and Juwelier Schönmann